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ALP Cycles Climbing Challenge

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ALP Cycles Climbing Challenge

Fall is around the corner and that means one thing; the Climbing Challenge is coming. As the race season winds down, many of us are stuck looking for something to do. We have great fitness and no event to use it in. Not any more. October 4-7th will be year 4 of the ALP Cycles Coaching Climbing Challenge. You will have 4 days and 9-11hrs max (depending on age) to climb as much as possible (the contest will be keep track on Strava). We will have prizes and fun activities to do and to participate in.

The 4-day challenge is highlighted by our ALP Climbing Ride on Saturday October 6th. We start in Boulder, climb up 4-mile to Logan Mill, up and down Arkansas Mtn to Sugarloaf, up to the Peak to Peak, and finish with the shelf road to Eldora Ski area- a 26mile ride with almost 5,000ft of climbing and sections up to 17% on dirt roads. It will test everyone's fitness, bike handling, and comfort zone. i.e.- a chance to make yourself a better and more complete bike rider. The Arkansas Mountain Climbing Day will be mandatory for any local riders doing the Challenge. This ride is open to ALP, non-ALP, and wanna be ALP athletes/riders/racers (so invite your friends, family, and teammates).  We provide coaches, a van stop with snacks, and NBS drink mix and water. 

Here is a link to the route on Strava-https://www.strava.com/segments/10356632?filter=overall&gender=F

 The road up Arkansas Mountain 

The road up Arkansas Mountain 

 The finish line

The finish line

The details- If are you under the age of 30, you have 10 hrs in 4 days to climb as much as you can. If you are 31-49, you have 10.5hrs in 4 days to climb as much as you can. If you are 50+, you have 11hrs in 4 days to climb as much as you can. You must have a Garmin or an on-bike computer that has GPS and can be uploaded to Strava. You must create a basic Strava account (it's free). All rides must start and end in the same place- with the exception of the Arkansas Mountain ALP ride. You do not have to live in Colorado. That's the cool thing, no matter where you live you can participate (as long as there is something you can climb on your bike). You do not have to do the challenge in order to come on the Saturday ALP ride. This challenge and the ALP ride are open to everyone. So invite your friends, family, teammates, etc. The more the merrier! This is our way of motivating people to train for a fun/hard event and giving non-ALP athletes a chance to ride with us and see how cool our little ALP community is.

Prizes- This year, our prizes are "ALP Bucks" (ALPb's) for the 4-day challenge. The winner gets 400 ALPb's to be used on anything ALP. Coaching, race team fees, clothing, ALP Tour of Colorado, etc. Second place gets 250 ALPb's and 100 ALPb's to 3rd place. 

If you are interested in joining us and/or would like more info- please email alison at Alpcyclescoaching dot com

In addition to the actual Climbing Challenge, we will also have a social media photo contest. Using the hashtag #alpclimbingchallenge, we'll pick the best photo of the 4 days and that winner will receive KUHL schwag/clothing. 

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Time Trial- How To

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Time Trial- How To

Today, we have our monthly ALP Ride (coach/athlete ride). The goal of this month's ride is to not only pre ride the Morgul Time Trial near Boulder, Colorado- but to dial in our time trailing strategy so no matter what the course, our ALP athletes would know how to look at the course and come up with their own individual race plans.

 Alison Powers in route to winning the 2014 National TT

Alison Powers in route to winning the 2014 National TT

 

2 time National Time Trial Champion Alison Powers, former Swiss TT champ Patricia Schwager, and ALP Coach extraordinaire Jen Sharp will lead the ride and talk about the key elements of Time Trialling. These elements include-

1- How to look at a course and break it into sections- then create a plan for each section

2- How to carry your speed and momentum- especially over varied terrain and corners

3- How to create speed and momentum- especially over varied terrain and corners

4- Being aerodynamic while limiting movement and staying relaxed.

We will analyze the course, come up with a race plan, and tackle each section with 100% effort. We will video so our ALP athletes can see how they look on their bikes while going hard. We can analyze things such as- does the athlete stay aero dynamic, where is their head position, and how much movement do they have when riding?

Time trials are the purest of all bike races. It's you against the clock; where your legs do the talking. It sounds simple in theory - the fastest person wins. But it's far from the easiest discipline. Time trials are a true test of not only physical but mental fitness. Below you'll find some tips that will help you in your next time trial.

1. Dial in your equipment.

Preferably, several weeks before your race. Showing up to a time trial with a bike for the first time without any saddle time can spell disaster. If you can, get a professional bike fitter to assist you in dialing in your position. The shorter the TT, the more aerodynamic you'll want to be. Equipment also includes race wheels and a rear disc, aero helmets, booties, skin suits, etc. If you have long hair, put it in a bun and tuck it inside of your helmet or braid it. If your time trial is under an hour, take off your water bottle cage.

2. Practice, practice, practice.

 Once you've dialed in your equipment and position, you must practice being in the aerodynamic position. It will take your body a little while to adapt to this position, and riding your time trial bike in the aero position is the best way to do this.

3. Cornering.

You can't win a time trial by cornering, but you can lose it in the corners by dumping your bike, over-braking or going off course. Practice corners and 180 degree turnarounds. It's okay to come out of the aero bars to navigate a corner. Just get back up to speed and into your bars as quickly as possible.

4. Limit your movement.

 Meaning, don't look down at your computer, back behind you, in front of you and repeat. Keep your eyes forward, neck turtled, and arms in the aero bars. Additional movement creates drag and extra drag slows you down. Your legs should be moving and that's it.

5. Pre-ride the course.

If you can pre-ride the course a week or more before, do it. Practice key sections and time yourself so you know how hard you need to push it during each part. Memorize sections so you know how much further you have until the finish. Visualize the course before you go to bed each night, practicing key sections in your head.

6. Time trial is about what happens between the ears.

Positive self talk is critical to your success. Coming up with a mantra in practice will help you during a race. Alison came up with a great one, printed on the collar of every ALP Cycles Coaching jersey: Better. Faster.Stronger.

 

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A More Complete Cyclist

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A More Complete Cyclist

By Head ALP Coach and 5-time National Champion Alison Powers

If there was one magic training tool that you could do to become a better, faster, and more confident cyclist, would you do it? For most of us, the answer would be 'yes". Unfortunately, not very many people do this one thing. What is this one magic ticket? Improve your bike handling skills. While training, most people are focused on how many watts they are pushing instead of how many times they brake through a corner. Being able to carry speed through a corner or sit in the draft of a peloton is free speed. No intervals or recovery days are needed for free speed.

30 minutes, once a week is all it takes to vastly improve your skills and gain free speed through corners, in a pack, on single track, etc. With good bike handling skills, you will be relaxed, confident, and recovering, while others struggle, slow down, and lose valuable speed.

Here are 6 drills you can do, on your own, to improve your bike handling skills.

The Slow Race

- Pick a start and finish line about 30 meters apart and go as slow as possible from start to finish. Practice this drill standing and seated.- Goal- work on balance

Cone Pick-Up

- Place a cone or water bottle on the ground and slowly ride by and pick it up off the ground. Goal- balance, body/ bike separation, and the basic beginnings of proper cornering.

Slalom

- set a cone (or water bottle) slalom and ride through the cones while standing and seated. Goal- dynamic movements, bike/body separation, looking ahead, balance.

Off Set Slalom

- set a cone (or water bottle) slalom with direction changes and ride through the cones while standing and seated. Goal- dynamic movements, bike/body separation, looking ahead, balance, working the bike and creating speed.

Bunny Hop

- set two cones or a water bottle on the ground and practice jumping over it while riding. Goal- learn to avoid holes, crubs, debris, rocks, etc. Timing, looking ahead, anticipating.

Parking Space Figure-8's

- Find a parking space, or two, and ride figure 8's within the space. Goal- balance, steering your bike, looking ahead, feathering brakes.

 

This is just a sampling of the many bike handling skills and drills that can be done to make yourself a better and more confident cyclist.

 

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Gain Fitness and Burn off Holiday Cookies with this Holiday Workout

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Gain Fitness and Burn off Holiday Cookies with this Holiday Workout

Here in Colorado, our winter weather is sometimes not conducive for a big 'burn lots of calories' ride before eating a holiday dinner. For those that like to ski and/or play in the snow, winter weather is great for them. For those of us who prefer to ride our bikes over the holidays, snow and cold is not so great. The good news is you can have your pie and eat it too, thanks to a high quality trainer workout. Done properly, this workout is 75min with an Intensity Factor of .83. The interval part of the workout is 40min with an IF of .91-- as hard as your local crit race. You'll work on your aerobic engine with tempo bursts, anaerobic power with 8 VO2 intervals, and your leg speed with cadence drills.

All in all, the perfect workout for a Holiday morning.

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Tempo Bursts and VO2 intervals- Trainer workout

Warm-up

10 min zone 2- 90+ rpm 3min tempo 2 min rest 2x1min fast pedals (100+rpm) to get the legs going- 1min RBI- rest between intervals 2min rest -Main Set- 1x15 min TEMPO (zone 3) with 10sec bursts every 2 min- a burst is a mini seated high cadence sprint

5min rest

8x1min high VO2- 1min off

Finish with 5min tempo at 85-95 rpm

Cool down 10-15min

Foam roll, stretch, shower, eat.

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Happy Holidays from ALP Cycles Coaching!

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What Makes a Great Coach?

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What Makes a Great Coach?

It’s the time of year when many people start to think about 2018 and their cycling and performance goals. Having a coach in your side can help you on your way to achieving those goals. Having a great coach in your corner leads you, teaches you, helps you, and makes sure you achieve those goals. A good coach and a great coach; there is a difference.

Here at ALP Cycles Coaching, we believe we know what a great coach is, but to be sure, we put the question to social media. What makes a great coach? The answers varied and included things like; understanding, common sense, and the ability to explain a plan. The ability to listen and a partner in success. Personality, versatility, and phone calls. Someone you trust. Someone who has the ability to balance goals, personal life, vacations, recovery periods, and work travel. Racing experience. Ability to motivate and encourage. Enthusiasm. Genuine concern for athlete and their progress. Constructive feedback. Helping an athlete recognize their strengths and weaknesses.

With this social media feedback and our own experiences as coaches and as athletes being coached, it would seem that a great coach is a partner and a teammate. A great coach is on your side with your goals in mind, showing and teaching you the way to achieve your goals—through thick and thin, through good times and bad.

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Interested in a training plan, but not full on coaching? That’s ok! We have you covered. We have created a 12-week off season training plan complete with strength training exercises, videos, and on bike cadence and leg speed drills. You will not find a more detailed and in depth 3 month training plan. The goal of this off season strength and training plan is to make you are more complete athlete with challenging full body strength and coordination exercises and workouts, and on the bike workouts to increase your leg speed, leg strength, and endurance. Check out the TrainingPeaks training plan here.

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 A great coach can inspire confidence on the bike. Photo by Mahting Productions

A great coach can inspire confidence on the bike. Photo by Mahting Productions

 We put the question to our ALP coaches. A great coach is someone who is organized, has passion for the sport and it’s athletes and competitors. A great coach has a true desire to help people reach their goals. A great coach is someone who is always learning and striving to be their best by sharing their knowledge and wisdom with their athletes. Someone who is always there for an athlete, no matter if everything goes as planned or if things are a bit difficult. A great coach is always keeping up what her/his athletes are doing and the athlete is never without a plan or communication. A great coach learns from their mistakes and turns failures into successes by practicing what they preach to their athletes. A great coach provides a high level of accountability and is truly invested in their athletes both on and off the bike. A great coach is part physiologist. A great coach is a true teacher of the sport.

When looking for a new coach, many people do not know what to expect from a coach. Why is one coach $150 a month and another one is $300 a month? Other than a training plan to get me fitter and stronger, what else does a coach offer? This is where coaching and coaching services vary- big time. There is no set standard on what a cycling coach should provide. Some coaches provide an excellent training plan but do nothing to teach you how to race the last 5 laps of a criterium so you have the best chance at winning. Some coaches are so excited to help you reach your goals that they don’t take the time to listen to how you are feeling and responding to the training. Some coaches have big names and big business but send out their training plans 2 days late leaving you guessing. You must take it upon yourself to determine what you expect from your coach.

So, what makes a great coach? From the social media feedback and personal experience, for each person a great coach something a little bit different. A great coach to one person may not be a great coach to another person. Each athlete is looking for something different in a partner and a teammate to reach their goals. The most important take away is to find a coach that you know will be your partner, your teammate and will work with you 100% toward your personal goals. 87% is not a great coach- 100% is a great coach.

 A great coach can teach the athlete race tactics and give confidence in a race plan. Photo credit to SnowyMountain Photography.

A great coach can teach the athlete race tactics and give confidence in a race plan. Photo credit to SnowyMountain Photography.

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Do’s and Don’ts of the Off Season

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Do’s and Don’ts of the Off Season

By Swiss Miss, TrainingPeaks Certified, and ALP Coach Patricia Schwager

The off season is here and that means time off, time for vacation, or time for activities that you can’t really do during race season. Unless you are racing CX races- then your situation is different.

There are some things you should and shouldn’t do during the off season. Even though it sounds like an easy time, the off season is an important time. Believe it or not, things you do during the off season have a big influence on your next race season.

Spending your time on the couch for a whole month isn’t the right thing to do and neither is riding/working out like crazy.

I have had to learn it the hard way- I admit that. I’ve made mistakes during my past off seasons. Mainly because I can’t sit still and just like to be active. Resting can be hard too!

-Your last race of the season might be in the books for a while but keep riding! It is a good idea to get in some longer rides during September and even into October. Make use of the (hopefully) nice autumn weather and your good fitness from a summer of racing and training.

-The next step is to take a real break (2-3 weeks). After a long race season, it is important to rest your body and mind.

-It depends on when your first race will be in the new season, but your structured training should start again in November.

-The idea is to build up your fitness for next season step by step. Your coach should be able to provide you with a good plan that fits your needs and help you to prepare for next season.

-Next to riding your bike, this plan should also include strength and cross training. This is essential as it builds up full body strength that got lost during race season. Next to improving your fitness, it will also challenge your mobility and balance and helps to prevent injury.

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Interested in a training plan, but not full on coaching? That’s ok! We have you covered. ALP Coach Coaching has created a 12-week off season training plan complete with strength training exercises, videos, and on bike cadence and leg speed drills. You will not find a more detailed and in depth 3 month training plan. The goal of this off season strength and training plan is to make you are more complete athlete with challenging full body strength and coordination exercises and workouts, and on the bike workouts to increase your leg speed, leg strength, and endurance. Check out the TrainingPeaks training plan here.

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-Off season is the perfect time to work on your weaknesses (bike handling skills, leg speed, etc). Talk to your coach if he/she doesn’t already address this point!

-Work on your bike handling and riding skills. This can be very simple, go to an empty parking lot and set up some cones or water bottles. Work on skills like: picking up water bottles, cornering, track stands, bunny hopping, riding figure 8’s, taking off jackets, arm warmers etc., riding no-handed, 180 turns, the list goes on. Being able to master these skills will make you feel more comfortable on your bike and make you a better bike rider.

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-If you have to adjust things, like your bike position (for example), use the off season to do it. The same counts for getting used to new shoes, new cleats, pedal systems, saddles. It is never a good idea to dial in or change important equipment once race season has started.

-Try to avoid weight gain in the off season. It is ok to enjoy some goodies but don’t overdo it. Being a little bit heavier during winter is no problem as long as you can lose it come spring time.

-Analyze your past race-season and set goals for the next season. Sit down and reflect on the past season, what went well, what went wrong and where can you improve or work on. Set your goals for next season and write them down.

As an ALP Cycles athlete, you will get a review and goals questionnaire. This helps us coaches a lot because feedback from our athletes is very important. We will go over the completed questionnaire and discuss the answers and options with our athletes. We do this because our goal is to make coaching even better for the approaching race season.

Enjoy your off season!

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ALP Cycles Coaching Climbing Challenge

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ALP Cycles Coaching Climbing Challenge

Fall is around the corner and that means one thing; the Climbing Challenge is coming. As the race season winds down, many of us are stuck looking for something to do. We have great fitness and no event to use it in. Not any more. September 28th- October 1st will be year 3 of the ALP Cycles Coaching Climbing Challenge. You will have 4 days and 9-11hrs max (depending on age) to climb as much as possible (the contest will be keep track on Strava). We will have prizes and fun activities to do and to participate in.

The 4-day challenge is highlighted by our ALP Climbing Ride on Saturday September 30th. We start in Boulder, climb up 4-mile to Logan Mill, up and down Arkansas Mtn to Sugarloaf, up to the Peak to Peak, and finish with the shelf road to Eldora Ski area- a 26mile ride with almost 5,000ft of climbing and sections up to 17% on dirt roads. It will test everyone's fitness, bike handling, and comfort zone. i.e.- a chance to make yourself a better and more complete bike rider. Th Arkansas Mountain Climbing Day will be mandatory for any local riders doing the Challenge. This ride is open to ALP and non-ALP athletes (so invite your friends, family, and teammates).  We provide coaches, a van stop with snacks, and NBS drink mix and water. 

Here is a link to the route on Strava-https://www.strava.com/segments/10356632?filter=overall&gender=F

 The road up Arkansas Mountain 

The road up Arkansas Mountain 

 The finish line

The finish line

The details- If are you under the age of 30, you have 10 hrs in 4 days to climb as much as you can. If you are 31-49, you have 10.5hrs in 4 days to climb as much as you can. If you are 50+, you have 11hrs in 4 days to climb as much as you can. You must have a Garmin or an on-bike computer that has GPS and can be uploaded to Strava. You must create a basic Strava account (it's free). All rides must start and end in the same place- with the exception of the Arkansas Mountain ALP ride. You do not have to live in Colorado. That's the cool thing, no matter where you live you can participate (as long as there is something you can climb on your bike). You do not have to do the challenge in order to come on the Saturday ALP ride. This challenge and the ALP ride are open to everyone. So invite your friends, family, teammates, etc. The more the merrier! This is our way of motivating people to train for a fun/hard event and giving non-ALP athletes a chance to ride with us and see how cool our little ALP community is.

Prizes- We will have prizes for the 4-day challenge. These prizes include- A free month of coaching ($225 value), a one hour skills/clinic with your ALP coach of choice ($85 value) and ALP Schwag (hats, T-shirt, Pactimo Jersey).

If you are interested in joining us and/or would like more info- please email alison at Alpcyclescoaching dot com

Pictures from last year's ALP ride up Arkansas Mountain

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A More Complete Cyclist

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A More Complete Cyclist

By Head ALP Coach and 5-time National Champion Alison Powers

If there was one magic training tool that you could do to become a better, faster, and more confident cyclist, would you do it? For most of us, the answer would be 'yes". Unfortunately, not very many people do this one thing. What is this one magic ticket? Improve your bike handling skills. While training, most people are focused on how many watts they are pushing instead of how many times they brake through a corner. Being able to carry speed through a corner or sit in the draft of a peloton is free speed. No intervals or recovery days are needed for free speed.

30 minutes, once a week is all it takes to vastly improve your skills and gain free speed through corners, in a pack, on single track, etc. With good bike handling skills, you will be relaxed, confident, and recovering, while others struggle, slow down, and lose valuable speed.

Here are 6 drills you can do, on your own, to improve your bike handling skills.

The Slow Race

- Pick a start and finish line about 30 meters apart and go as slow as possible from start to finish. Practice this drill standing and seated.- Goal- work on balance

Cone Pick-Up

- Place a cone or water bottle on the ground and slowly ride by and pick it up off the ground. Goal- balance, body/ bike separation, and the basic beginnings of proper cornering.

Slalom

- set a cone (or water bottle) slalom and ride through the cones while standing and seated. Goal- dynamic movements, bike/body separation, looking ahead, balance.

Off Set Slalom

- set a cone (or water bottle) slalom with direction changes and ride through the cones while standing and seated. Goal- dynamic movements, bike/body separation, looking ahead, balance, working the bike and creating speed.

Bunny Hop

- set two cones or a water bottle on the ground and practice jumping over it while riding. Goal- learn to avoid holes, crubs, debris, rocks, etc. Timing, looking ahead, anticipating.

Parking Space Figure-8's

- Find a parking space, or two, and ride figure 8's within the space. Goal- balance, steering your bike, looking ahead, feathering brakes.

 

This is just a sampling of the many bike handling skills and drills that can be done to make yourself a better and more confident cyclist.

 

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Quality Over Quantity

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Quality Over Quantity

By USAC Level 2 and TrainingPeaks Level 1 certified ALP Cycles  Head Coach Alison Powers

For most of us, we don’t have 15-25hrs each week to train and ride our bike. We have to make the most of what time to train we have. For this reason each training ride or workout session must be quality. The secret, then, is knowing if your ride or workout really was good quality, or if you were just going through the motions. When I look at an athletes ride file, one of the first things I do is look at time spent in various training zones. If the goal of the workout was a steady 2.5hr Zones 2-3 endurance ride and she spent 65min in Zone 1 and 10 min coasting, I know that was not a quality ride. Zone 1 (>55% of Threshold) is good for the start of a warm up, cooling down, doing a recovery ride, and recovering between hard efforts. Zone 1 is not good for building endurance, as it doesn’t tax any energy system hard enough to create a training response. This means, an hour of this athlete’s ride was wasted and she only got a good 90min of training time. Ok, minus 15 min easy warm-up and 15min mellow cool down and she still has 35 min of wasted training time—plus 10 min of coasting, which does absolutely nothing for fitness (unless resting from going very, very hard).

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Interested in a training plan, but not full on coaching? That’s ok! We have you covered. We have created training plans to fit lifestyle and training goals. Don't see a training plan that fits your goal? Let us know and we'd be happy to create one for you. 

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With 9-14hrs of training time a week that most of us have, we have to make every single workout count. Everything has to be quality, or else you are wasting your time. The question then becomes, how do I know if it’s quality? The answer is through goal setting and focus. Every single workout and training ride must have a goal. The goal of the workout might be specific time in Tempo, or speed limit sign sprints, or a steady endurance ride at a specific cadence, etc. Even recovery rides must a have goal and focus. When you ride, make sure you are accomplishing that goal.

You must also stay focused on the little things like staying relaxed and keeping your shoulders down, working on a specific cadence, spending some time in your drops, keeping your head down when riding your TT bike, etc. Every little thing matters and you must stay focused on the goal of that specific workout.

My most favorite training tip for getting a super quality ride is- no coasting and no soft pedaling. You’d be amazed by how taxing and tiring it is to go ride for 2 hour at zone 2 without coasting or soft pedaling. Want to make it even harder? Aim for a 95+ cadence- the entire time. That is a quality 2 hour ride that will beat out any 3 hour ride with time spent coasting, surging, and soft pedaling. Your weekly training hours are precious. Make the most of them and make every bike ride and every workout count.

Happy (quality) Training!

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As an athlete of ALP Cycles Coaching, you will receive monthly training plans, phone calls, e-mail updates, and “hands on coaching” with athlete training rides and/or workout sessions. You also receive discounts toward ALP Cycles training camps, skills clinics, clothing, and race/team tactics lessons.

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Posture on the Bike

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Posture on the Bike

By USAC Level 2 and TrainingPeaks Level 1 certified ALP Cycles Coach Alison Powers

Not a lot of attention is spent on how we sit on our bikes. Yes, most of us take the time to get a proper bike fit, which is good. However, a proper bike fit is one thing, what you do with your body in that fit is another thing. How do you sit on your bike and do you make use of strong core muscles to provide a solid base from which to make power and ride pain free?

During a session of Pilates a few months back, it came to my attention that if I rode my bike using the same muscles in my core as I do in Pilates, I would ride stronger, longer and more pain free. We all spend time working on our core strength, but if we don’t use that core strength when riding, then it doesn’t really matter. Without utilizing our core muscles, our spines will collapse, pain will ensue, followed by poor and/or un-enjoyable cycling performance.

This got me thinking. When I ride my bike with a strong core, not only do my watts go up and I clear technical terrain more easily, it feels almost like I am doing a plank or getting ready to do a push-up. I have a long and open spine. My low belly is working and my shoulders are down and back. I’m gently pulling back with my arms opening my shoulders (helping me breath) while also helping to stabilize. This plugs everything in together- into my core. I am pain free and I am strong.

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Want to get better and faster on your bike, but not ready to commit to full on coaching? Check out our training plans . These plans range from off season training and strength training to final preparation for the race season. Be ready for 2017 to be your best yet. 

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Take a minute to think about it- if your position and how you sit on the bike is a position that you would not do a push-up in, then your posture on the bike is wrong. If you bounce or have excessive upper body movement when you pedal, then your core is not working. If you are sinking into any parts of your back or shoulders when riding, then your core is not working. Get your low belly working. The stronger your low belly gets, it will make your back more stable and you’ll have added power to the pedals.

 Proper plank/push-up position

Proper plank/push-up position

 Strong core with length in the spine

Strong core with length in the spine

 Rounded spin

Rounded spin

 Rounded spine on the bike

Rounded spine on the bike

 shoulder and low back sinking

shoulder and low back sinking

 shoulder sinking while riding

shoulder sinking while riding

Pay attention to how you sit on the bike- especially when you ride hard. Do you have a long, open spin or are you sinking into any parts of your spine? Are you sitting on your sits bones? Is your low belly working? Your shoulders should be down, back, and open.

Pull gently with your arms to plug it all together. You should feel like you are doing a plank in perfect form.

Spend time this off season to dial in your core strength and your posture on the bike. Come Spring with long hours on the bike, the last thing you want to endure is back pain and old, bad, habits.

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